in memory HR Walker
title
flag
HOME
Scroll down to see all links


Blog Subjects

Also See Love Stories Section
and
Alice's Family Page w Memoirs


  • November 23, 2019: The Ring-Thoughts From A Weird Mind

    _______

  • May 15, 2019: Cornea Transplant Status Report

    _______

  • April 22, 2018: Stress Meets Its Match

  • September 9, 2017: 50 Years of Camping with Alice and Jerry

    _______

  • March 31, 2017: My Dream,You Interpret

    _______

  • May 11, 2016: DNA and the Birds and the Bees

    _______

  • August 17, 2015: Alice's Mother and Father's Memoirs

    _______

  • July 24, 2015: Book Review: The Living Mind by Alan Scott

    _______

  • June 14, 2015: My Thoughts On Heaven

    _______

  • Sept. 2012: My War on Geese

    _______

  • Dec 2011: Conservatives Should Give Santorum A Second Look

    _______

  • October 2011: The Hottest Escorts on the MightyMo

    _______

  • May 2009: Stand Up For Freedom

    _______

  • September 2008: America's Energy Independence Future

    _______

  • April 2007: Fidel Climbs on Bandwagon
    (for Global Warming)

    _______

  • March 2007:: Global Cooling Is Back

    _______

  • February 2007: Global Warming
    (Anthropogenic Climate Change)

    _______

  • January 2007: Comman Sense About Doom's Day Clock

    _______

  • January 16, 2007: Surviving the Ice Storm

    _______

  • Martha Ann Denton Baker
    Civil War Letter

    Martha Baker

    By Mary A. Gardner Holland, first published 1897
    (this book has been re-published several times in recent history)
    Below is an excerpt from pages 228-230 of book published in 2012 by Forgotten Books
    This excerpt is a letter written by Martha Ann Denton Baker to the author. Martha Baker is the grand-mother of my wife, Beulah Alice Baker Walker
    Martha Baker's Letter :

    I was born in Concord Indiana in 1838, a daughter of Benjamin and Anna Genton. At the age of 16 I went to Sugar Grove Institute. In 1859 my mother and father, both being dead, I was married to Abner Baker. In February 1862, my husband enlisted in the 40th Indiana Volunteers, leaving me at my brothers with our little girl. After the battle of Chickamauga he was sent to Nashville, in charge of 27 officers. Finding that he was an extra good nurse he was transferred to the 160th Battalion Veterans Relief Corps, and made chief wound-dresser of one ward in the Officers´┐Ż Hospital. He then wrote for me, and I went from Stockwell, Ind., January 1854, and was appointed to the Special Diet Kitchen, under the charge of Major Lyons. At that time we prepared food for the Officers Hospital and No. 2, --about 500 men.

    Just before the battle of Atlanta a good many of the boys went home to vote, and it cut us short of hands, as we had 1500 to cook for, and but little help. Our strength was taxed to the utmost. Sometimes it was almost impossible to keep up, but with the aid of the Lord, who always strengthens and prepares the back for the burden, we were enabled to do our duties, and speak a few words of comfort to the poor soldiers who were away from home and friends. We are glad to see our boys come back from their furlough, and to think they remembered to bring us some tokens of love from Mother or Sister. We shall always remember the kindness of the soldiers.

    Doctor Green, an especial friend of ours, was put in assistant surgeon, and he often came for my little girl to go with him to see the patients; he would laugh and say she did them as much well as he did.

    I was there during the battle of Nashville. Cannon were placed within 100 yards of our building. I saw men bayonetted from the breastwork. The cannonading was so heavy it shook the building. There I beheld the horrors of war and after the battle, the sad sight of the ambulances coming in with their fearful loads.

    With almost breaking hearts our hands were still busy caring for the wounded.

    I met two soldier girls who had gone the bluefootnote 1. One, Francis Hookfootnote 2, alias Harry Miller, served two years and nine months; the other was called Anna. She was put under our charge until the Military authorities could send her North.

    I left the service February, 1865.

    Yours truly,
    Martha A. Baker.

    ___________________


    Footnotes:
    1. by blue she means the girl pretended to be a male soldier
    2. Francis Hook is a well known Civil War soldier who pretended to be a man.
    See History of Amrican Woment

     

    Copyright © June 14, 2000 Jerry Lee Walker Sr.